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Pitch or Pitch? Reflecting on a Personal Keepsake

In memory of my high school choir director,  Andy Housholder.

 

Not many families still have vinyl records.  Not many have turn tables to play these on.  But I am blessed to have both, and especially to be able to listen to this special album recorded in 1975.

This is what I call a precious keepsake.  It brings back memories of community, commitment, affirmation, exhilaration, determination and connection.  

Music does this for all of us. Music moves us. It takes us to places and memories, both in the present and the past.  We are transported back to other times in our lives.  But for me this is truly something I hold dear, my high school choir, the people who were in choir with me, and the affirmation from our director.  Mr. Housholder brought out the best in all of us, through hard work, time spent together, and personal dedication.  It is a lifelong lesson that I learned.  I learned that my commitment can mean more than my skill set.   Ask for excellence and experience an amazing result.  Work together as a team and experience a result that is far beyond one person’s effort.  The spirit of the music brings back all these memories, as well as affirms me in all that I do now.  

So is it is pitch (toss) or pitch (keeping in tune)? For me, it will be tuning up my life, for a long, long time.

Is it valuable? Personal Notes on Organizing Your Memorabilia

organizing keepsakes

 

Our biggest question when it comes to memorabilia is whether it is valuable.  I have faced this question myself and have found that there are a few extra steps that may make you feel more comfortable in finding the value of your keepsakes.  It will definitely take extra time and extra steps, however here are some ideas to help you process this decision.

  • Look online to find the item.  My husband had a vase that he inherited from his mom that he knew was “valuable.”   We found a duplicate for sale on ebay for $70.  Once we knew a true value, then we made an educated decision on the next step.
  • Check online for associations related to your memorabilia.   When I sold my mom’s paperweight collection, I was able to connect with local paperweight associations. I made a list of the items and I listed it there.  It took a while (two months) and found a buyer who appreciated this collection and would sell these to others who appreciate paperweights.
  • Donate your items to a charity silent auction.  If you are passionate about a cause, you will find the value of your items priceless in helping your cause reach a financial goal.  After trying numerous ways to sell a silver plated tea set including Craigs List, Replacements and Ebay, I donated the set to Mothers Against Cancer (www.mothersagainstcancer.org.)
  • Check online at ItsDeductibleOnline.com.  This values items and is an easy way to track your charitable donations.
  • Find experts who can help you make a good decision on value and find a purchaser.  There are independent appraisers in many different fields, including art, to assist you.  One connection for us led to the sale of a family painting.

Memorabilia can be overwhelming and emotional.  All of these items we were ready to part with, especially knowing that these are not items our children would treasure.  Decide if YOU love the keepsakes, and are not only keeping them for other reasons.  If you are truly organizing your memorabilia, be sure to choose a way to honor and display your items. Needless to say, that is not in a smushed box in the garage or attic!  Today I have 5 paperweights from Mom’s collection in a hutch in my dining room.  I treasure them!