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Finding your Motivation

 

 

finding your motivation

 

There’s nothing more motivating than, “company’s coming” when it comes to organzing.

There’s many motivations for making a change, getting organized and being more productive. There’s also many obstacles that keep us from getting started. One of those might be ADHD, where procrastination, lack of organizing skills and being overwhelmed keep you from getting started. Having inspiration and accountability can motivate you and get your work started. Finding your motivation is key.

 

Motivational Experiences

I recently met with a client who knew, now is the time to get organized. She had experienced flooding, health challenges and was looking at new healthy choices. She had recently rebuilt her home and was prepared to make her home the organized and productive spot she craved. Her life with ADHD had held her back before and now she had compelling reasons to begin.

I have also met with client who worked long hours, raised her family and one day looked at her home and said, “wow how did all this stuff get here?” She had invested her time in good and important goals and now knew it was time to make a change in her surroundings. While focused on the important parts of making a living for her family, she had gotten overwhelmed with the inflow of stuff.

When you know it’s time to make a change to your life, your home, your work, that’s the most compelling time to get organized. What makes for a compelling reason to change? It’s truly an individual decision and a decision you can make at any time.

 

 Motivational Media

Motivation in the form of Marie Kondo’s Netflix show is sweeping the nation this year. A new show called Home Edit is in production. It’s leading to other media connections, like podcasts, blog posts, and social media. In Tidying Up the tv show, we see many like us who have struggled with clutter. The kind inspiration offered by Marie Kondo leads us to be grateful and let go of things that are unneeded.

 

There are social media posts that are keeping us motivated too. Seeing other’s conquer their clutter on Instagram or Facebook help us know that we can do this. Forming a social media group that works together to reaffirm your motivation, keep you accountable by posting your successes and support you as you move forward are very instrumental. There’s existing clutter support on Facebook to join if you want this resource.

 

Motivational Practices

Decluttering is overwhelming. Setting quick, small, practical and realistic routines into place make it easy to be motivated. These practices include placing 5 items in a bag once a week and dropping these off at a donation location, or decluttering for 10 minutes in one space daily. It’s about creating baby steps that moves you forward.

Schedule time for organizing. In our busy lives, while we are motivated, we have not assigned a time to do the work. That time must be designed into your schedule each.

 

Motivational Team Members

Your team is crucial to your motivation. It’s about feeling truly supported as you work. That support comes in questions that coach you, support that acknowledges feelings and praise for each step. There’s no limit to your possible team members including those available by cell and facetime or professionals to coach and teach skills to your kids and grand kids. Start by building your team to help you begin and continue to be motivated.

 

The most compelling motivation to me has always been something I keep very close in my thoughts. Every day it is those thoughts that help me make the choices that impact my life in a positive way. Thankfully it has been making priorities clear and simple. I encourage you to think about your priorities and how they impact your motivation. Jump right in and get started on your organizing today!

best time to start was yesterday next best time is now

 

Choosing Priorities

choosing prioritities

 

Life is filled with choices. Here’s a list of the upcoming January events recently shared by Sallie Alefson.  There’s so many to celebrate!  Is there a way to choose which holidays to celebrate?  How will I prioritize?

January is:

  •         Financial Wellness Month
  •         Get A Balanced Life Month
  •          Get Organized  Month
  •         International Creativity Month
  •         International Quality of Life Month
  •         National Clean Up Your Computer Month

Special weeks include:

  •         8 – 14: Home Office Safety and Security Week
  •         22 – 29: Clean Out Your Inbox Week
  •         27 – 31: Tax Identity Theft Week

Noteworthy days:

  •         3: Festival of Sleep Day
  •         6: National Technology Day
  •         8: National English Toffee Day
  •         9: National Clean Off Your Desk Day
  •         10: National Cut Your Energy Costs Day
  •         14: Organize Your Home Day
  •         20: National Cheese Lovers Day
  •         24: Belly Laugh Day
  •         25: Macintosh Computer Day (marks the day it went on sale to the public in 1984)
  •         27: Fun at Work Day
  •         28: Data Privacy Day
  •         30: Bubble Wrap Appreciation Day

 

While each and every one of these events has merit, how do we choose which to celebrate?

I could rely on personal or business connections to an event. I focus on organizing and productivity, so I could choose the events related to my work.  Or I could choose which I think is most fun. There are lots of celebrations with laughter and joy.  Another option is to rely on my priorities for the 2017.  Each year I have a word of the year. Last year was Accept, 2015 was 15, 2014 was Thrive.  My word for the year could help me prioritize.

 

Whatever your way of prioritizing, we know there will always be more choices than we can imagine.  I can’t celebrate each holiday, but I can prioritize the 3 that best fit my priorities this year.

 

How do I stay true to those priorities?

First, you may be overwhelmed and instantly think all are equally important. Give yourself a moment to process either with others, by writing, by speaking or just thinking.  Each of us has a strength to rely on to make this decision. There are also tools we can use.  Use a tournament method to whittle down the possibilities, weighing just one option against just one other option.  Give each option a number value of 1,2, or 3.   Decide the return on investment with finances.  All of these strategies have value.

 

Make your priorities stick by creating a reminder resource. That’s a way to keep your priorities  upper most.  A reminder resource can be tucked away on Notes or Evernote in your smartphone, a vision board in your closet, or choosing your word for the year. It’s not easy staying on target with your priorities and reminders help.

 

 

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ADHD, Decision making and Organizing

 

ADHD Decision making and Organizing

 

Decision making is the first step in all organizing projects. And when those decisions become overwhelming is when we become paralyzed.  For ADHD and executive function challenges, decision making can halt organizing progress.  There’s a definite connection between ADHD, decision making and organizing.

 

Too many decisions

It’s overwhelming to think about the number of decisions we make in a day.  Research reveals that when we make decision after decision, we become frustrated, angry or anxious.  Each day we are make decisions about literally thousands of questions or crossroads.  When it comes to decision making, think about limiting choices.  Keep it simple like just 3 -5 options, rather than ten or more.

 

  • When you begin organizing, make decision making simple and easy.  Start with decisions to let go of things that are easy to part with, you have not used or seen in a long time, or without hesitation know your decision.

 

  • When it comes to the stuff in your life, one question can be all you need.  Make decision making easy with one big question to answer: does this make me look or feel fabulous?  If the answer is no, off it goes.

 

  • Use the tournament method.  Compare two items, pick the best.  Use the “winner”  and compare with another item, pick the best.  You can divide items into four piles and use the tournament method too.

 

 Good decisions start with wellness

It’s not surprising how much rest and nutrition play a role in good decision making.  Research shows that a good night’s sleep makes for better decision making, improved retention of information and a better outcome.

 

  • Get 7 to 8 hours of sleep each night. Not only will you feel better on all fronts, it’s easy to make decisions and be productive. Start with an earlier than expected prep time for bedtime. It’s easy to get in bed when you are ready.

 

 

  • Keep protein handy.  We can’t make good decisions with just snacks.  Eating protein regularly helps us think clearly.

 

 

 Resources for decision making

We know we don’t know it all.  But that’s not a problem! We have trust resources to help make decisions.   Our resources include an array of options, including our friends, professionals and the internet.  Build competence and confidence with your resources.

 

  • Start with your easiest way of finding information.  Phone or text a friend or look online are the simplest first steps.  Reading a book or blog can help you find the information you need.  Add in a clutter buddy or paper partner.  They are your trusted friend for decision making; your go to resource for no matter what the question is.  Decide on what’s easiest for you.

 

  • Take the emotion out of your decision.  Think about the decision as if you were making it for someone else.  Take a deep breath, do 10 jumping jacks, call a friend and share why this is so hard.  Ask yourself what’s the worst thing that can happen if this decision is not right.  Then get back to that decision.  It’s often not the decision at all that is hard but an emotion associated with it.

 

  • Ask for help.  It’s hard to accept ask for or accept help.  But a partnership can make all the difference.  Ask for help when you find yourself lacking a skill, not sure of how to manage technology or to speed the project along.  Remember that in doubling up with a partner you have more brain and brawn to find solutions.

 

We all get stuck sometime.  Find ways to help yourself with decision making whether it’s paring down, wellness, or resources to make decisions happen.

 

More resources  on my ADD/ADHD pinterest board.

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