3 Tips to Help You Get Organized to Stay Healthy

 

 

Health has been a long time priority for our family. Above all else, we prize taking care of ourselves and building good routines that support wellness.  Our motivation includes being a role model for our kids and grands kids. We know that what we do reflects on their choices.  As a family we have sadly had parents die at an early age. We want to live a long healthy life to spend time with our family and friends.  We have prioritized health and well being and you can too by adjusting a few tweaks to your self care and lifestyle.  Check out these 3 tips to help you get organized to stay healthy.

 

Make time for exercise in your schedule

Exercise is a stress fighter and immunity builder. It’s that important to be sure that even with the busiest of days with the longest hours, you add in exercise. There are so many ways you can make sure you exercise multiple times a week.  Set a schedule to include some exercise, whether it is a class at the gym or a far walk from your car to your office.  You can exercise with your family when you all take a walk together, ride bikes or online classes.

Finding the exercise you love helps you commit to this. Since 1988, I have prioritized taking a walk every day. I have the opportunity to set my own schedule, I start my day early with a walk. A variation of my walk can include a “walk and talk” with friends to keep connected or “think big time” about my business, professional next steps or personal goals. I have made the commitment to walk 10K steps a day currently and love that I am accomplishing this early in the day.

 

Make it easy to take medications, supplements and vitamins

While not everyone agrees on the value of supplements or vitamins, we do all agree that to take care of ourselves we need to make it easy. What is easy? It is placing your medicine or vitamins where they are easy to see and take each day.  Using a medicine organizer, you can be sure you are taking your daily doses timely. It’s easy to take medications by setting your alarm on your phone to be sure you take these at the correct time.  I carry a small ziplock of over the counter medicines to keep with me as I go about my day.  Using auto refill, it’s easy to have all your medications without hassle.  You can pull up to the pharmacy window to pick up your refill when texted. When things are accessible and easy to see, it’s easy to be sure we take what we intend or is prescribed.

 

Plan a great night’s rest

There’s nothing more powerful for wellness than a great night’s rest.  Experts share the many ways to help you relax and rest. With so much to think about and worry about, it’s hard to settle in.  However, getting more exercise helps us rest better. We slip into slumber more easily and stay asleep all night. As adults it is tempting to stay up late, binge watch and then hit the snooze button in the morning. It is a matter of creating a schedule that includes a bedtime that works for you.  By establishing time for tranquility, we are setting ourselves up for a better day tomorrow.

Here is how I get started scheduling my bed time. I start very early in getting ready for bed, like ridiculously early, at 6 pm. I wash my face and get ready in my night wear. I keep my bedroom very cold and very dark. Also my bed sheets are heavy and weighted. I plan on eight hours of rest. My bedtime and rise time are the same every day, including the weekend. As you can see, I love being rested! I am a creature of habit that makes it easier too. While you may not be a person with solid routines, take one of these tips to use for your bedtime.

 

Get started on these lifestyle changes with one small step. Over time, your new habits will be something to brag about to others.  Your family will be thrilled too.

 

 

 

Virtual Clutter Support Group June 2020

virtual clutter support group

 

Virtual Clutter Support Group for Individuals with ADHD

Organizing Your Home and Garage

June 2020

 

Hi friends,

Have you been struggling with getting organized, even with more time to do so? Don’t know where to start? Looking for accountability and resources to help you live the life that truly want in life? Need an affordable organizing solution? Is it time to get started and declutter your home?

Meet together for our Virtual Clutter Support Group for Individuals with ADHD! 

Join me in June for Professional-Organizer.com’s Virtual Clutter Support Group for Individuals with ADHD. This fee-based group is the starting point for your journey in transforming your life by helping you define, establish and maintain an uncluttered lifestyle. The Virtual Clutter Support Group is a four-week, one hour program where awareness starts, learning begins and action results. Each session will have a different topic for each week focusing on your home and garage.

• A place to share goals and challenges with consistent support
• An opportunity to learn organizing strategies for your home and work
• A place to champion your efforts and like-minded others to affirm everyone in their organizing journey.

Each session will have a different topic for each week, all about your home and garage.

  • Topics include organizing your closet, your kitchen, your bedroom and garage.
  • Agenda covers hot spots in the room, tips for organizing that space, and organizing ideas for individuals with ADHD
  • Meeting dates are Wednesdays in June (June 3, 10,17, 24)
  • Potential Meeting time is 6 – 7 pm central time.
  • Members meet online with me through Join.me. Join.me is a web-based collaboration software online meetings. You can join from a smart phone, smart device or your computer.

Fee is $100 for the four sessions. There is a limited membership. Register by June 1, 2020.
For information and to register, call 281.360.3928 or visit www.professional-organizer.com (fill in Clutter Support Group in Comments)

 

ADHD Friendly Ways to Clear Clutter and Organize Your House

 

adhd friendly ways to clear clutter and organize your home

 

 

Here is a 15 minute tutorial for ADHD Friendly Ways to Clear Your Clutter and Organize Your House.  

Please print this handout before you begin the tutorial.

ADHD Friendly Ways to Clear Clutter and Organize Your Home

(Handout)

 

 

Getting started

  • Start Small
  • Plan your time
  • Challenges of Perfectionism and procrastination
  • Emotional attachments
  • Financial attachments

 

Organizing strategies for your stuff

  • Plan your work and work your plan
  • Letting go (consignment, Facebook Marketplace, philanthropies)
  • Categorizing and organizing
  • A “Home” for your items
  • Organizing products
  • Working your plan and keeping organized

 

 

Tips for Getting and Staying Organized

  • Create routines for you and your home (Admin Day, Decluttering appointments)
  • Tricks and tips of labelling
  • Strategic work zones in your home
  • Finding a partner with a clutter buddy, body double, or paper partner
  • Make it fun with a playlist or reward

 

 

Resources

ADD Friendly Ways to Organize

The Magic of Tidying Up

Professional-Organizer.com Ellen’s Blog

 

Decluttering questions to ask yourself

 

Questions about use

  • Questions about use help you determine how often you use an item and if so, whether to keep it.
  • Do I love it or use it?
  • When was the last time I used it?
  • If it is less than $20 and it takes less than 20 minutes to get it again, can I let it go?
  • If you could fit in this right now, would you wear it?

 

Questions about quantity

  • Questions about quantity help you let go of excess.
  • How many of these do I need?
  • Would I buy this again today?
  • Where do I store it to find it again?

 

Questions for lifestyle

  • Questions about lifestyle help you acknowledge your feelings about an item.
  • Does this help me be my best self?
  • Will my future self use this?
  • Is this holding me back?

 

Questions about emotional attachment

  • Questions about emotional attachment define whether to keep an item or let it go.
  • Is this something that makes me sad or reminds me of a sad time?
  • Does this make me smile?
  • Do I honor it as a keepsake?

 

Questions about finances

  • Does this have value greater than $50?
  • Should I sell this or donate it?
  • Can it be a blessing to others who have great need?

 

 

 

ADHD Friendly Ways to Organize Your Papers

adhd friendly ways to organize paper

 

Join me for a 15 minute presentation on organizing your papers.

Please print this handout before you begin the presentation.

ADHD Friendly Ways to Organize Your Papers

(Handout)

 

 

Start big

 

  • Move from overwhelmed to informed
  • Keep the end in mind
  • Know what to keep and for how long

 

 

Organizing strategies for your papers

  • Your Command Center for actionable paper
  • Your Files for reference papers
  • Archive Files for long term storage
  • Organizing options

 

 

Going digital

  • Device options (photo, Genius Scan, Scanners)
  • Fundamentals
  • Organizing options

 

Staying organized

  • Triage time
  • Admin time
  • Back log

 

 

Home and Office Paper and Digital Organizing Categories

 

Home

 

  • House and Auto
    • Auto purchase
    • Home Major Purchases
    • Home Repair/Maintenance
    • House inventory
    • Insurance
  • Financial (anything to do with money)
    • Banking
    • Credit Cards
    • Investment
    • Retirement
    • Property Taxes
    • Life Insurance
    • Mortgage
  • Personal (anything to do with people or pets)
    • Medical Benefits
    • Medical History
    • Medical Explanation of Benefits
    • Medical Paid bills
    • School/University
    • (Interests such as parenting, decorating, collections, etc.)
  • Work
    • Work history
    • CV or resume

 

Office

    • Clients
    • Resources
    • Vendors
    • Projects
    • HR or Employees
    • Financials 20XX
    • Expenses

 

Resources

ABCs of Important Papers (Oprah.com)

My Life Packet

ADD Friendly Ways to Organize

 

COVID-19 How to Establish Schedules for Home, School and Work

covid-19 schedules for home, school and work

 

We have been at home for a few weeks now, settling in after COVID-19 news that staying home is important.  While the first week or so may have felt like snow days, it’s time to settle into schedules that help you stay productive and positive.  Schedules are repeated patterns that we use to empower our priorities.  Right now our priorities can be simple. We can embrace our new normal by patterning our days.

Basic concepts

Setting up your own schedule can be baffling to some. It is creating structure for yourself, which you may not be comfortable with or skilled at.  For some it’s natural to do. These basic concepts can help you craft your schedule.

  • Prioritize what is most important first. Right now that is simple, that being you have work and your kids have school. First this in first to your schedule. Depending on your own work and your kids’ schools, this may set your schedule directly.
  • Know your own personal strengths. Are you a morning person or not?  Take this quiz on The Power of When to know what works best. Most of us know this from all our personal experiences. Use your best time of the day to do your most important work.
  • Be sure to include self care, exercise, meals, bedtimes and reset time in your schedule. These routines help us be our best selves.
  • We tend to be overly ambitious about our schedules. Choose time blocks that help you keep focused and productive.  Too many time blocks and too much transition deter productivity. Use time blocking to help you create a schedule that works well. For example, choose a morning and afternoon 2 hour block rather than two one hour blocks each morning and afternoon.
  • Post your schedule for everyone to know the plan for the day.  Talk about your schedule at your family meeting, emphasize the value, and keep everyone on track with clocks and timers.

 

 

Sample School for a Morning Person

Monday – Friday Schedule  Morning Person Sample Schedule
6:00 AM Wake up

Reflection time or Meditation

6:30 AM Shower and dress
7:00 AM Wake kids
7:30 AM Breakfast
8:00 AM Daily exercise/Listen to a podcast
8:30 AM
9:00 AM Work and School start
9:30 AM
10:00 AM
10:30 AM Break
11:00 AM Work and school continue
11:30 AM
12:00 PM Lunch and Break
12:30 PM
1:00 PM Outside time
1:30 PM Work and school continue
2:00 PM
2:30 PM
3:00 PM
3:30 PM
4:00 PM Outside time
4:30 PM
5:00 PM Dinner
5:30 PM
6:00 PM
6:30 PM
7:00 PM Family time
7:30 PM Prep kids for bed
8:00 PM
8:30 PM Kids’ bedtime
9:00 PM
9:30 PM
10:00 PM Parent’s bedtime

 

Sample Schedule for Not a Morning Person

Monday – Friday Not a Morning Person Sample Schedule
8:00 AM Wake up

Reflection time or Meditation

8:30 AM Breakfast
9:00 AM Shower and Dress
9:30 AM
10:00 AM Work and School begin
10:30 AM
11:00 AM
11:30 AM
12:00 PM Lunch and Break
12:30 PM Outside time
1:00 PM Work and School continue
1:30 PM
2:00 PM
2:30 PM Outside time and Break
3:00 PM Work and School continue
3:30 PM
4:00 PM
4:30 PM
5:00 PM Outside time
5:30 PM
6:00 PM Dinner
6:30 PM
7:00 PM Family time
7:30 PM
8:00 PM Prep kids for bed
8:30 PM Kids’ bedtime
9:00 PM
9:30 PM
10:00 PM Parent’s bedtime

More Resources

How to Work from Home with Your Kids

CHADD Suddenly Working from Home

ADDitudemag Learning from Home Schedule

ADDitudemag Are you Corona Schooling? 

Kids Activities Blog Free School Resources

Today Show How to Home School

 

 

schedule

Family Schedule for Home School

 

Crafting calendaring habits that will change your life

Calendar and planner

 

Truly crafting calendar habits can change your life.  Calendars and planners are our road map to fulfill our goals and intentions. With a plan and tools you use well, your life will be easier, more productive and more rewarding.

Most especially at the start of the year, however all year long, we search for creative solutions to calendaring. There are two parts to this search. The search for the “perfect” tool” and the search for how to put it to use.  This year more of my clients with ADHD are crafting calendaring habits that are changing their lives.

 

How to get started

Get started by finding the right tools.  Know if you are a paper, digital or hybrid planner person.  I am learning that my clients do best with all three styles and a hybrid variation of these styles. In this case, my clients have a large month at a glance view, a week at a glance view, on both paper on a wall and in a medium sized paper planner. My clients use their phone, laptop and other devices to lay this out too.

Typically I have conversations about having one planner and this is not the case here!  While it does add time and focus to maintain these planners, it is valuable because all the view of all the information helps with processing. It gives context to the data.  On a month at a glance you see your information in comparison to other activities. On a week at a glance you know what you must accomplish in the short time span. With a digital version, you create recurring events and routines. While investing in these tools, you are investing in the opportunity to process information and keep all your balls in the air.

 

Routines to get started

Front loading is the way to start. This term means to add all dates and plans right away, as soon as you receive the information. It also means to front load the level of work required on a project. Front loading takes advantage of your natural energy and interest in both your tools and your projects.  Having these dates, projects and information easily accessible creates a foundation.

 

Keeping on keeping on

There are two elements that keep you on track with your new habits. First, keep adding information and dates as soon as you know about them. This information is in text, email, papers, conversations and meetings. It can be easy to lose track of these. Take time each day to record this in your planner.  Second, review your planner each morning and each evening. It is not enough to record and reviewing daily keeps this information top of mind and fresh.  When I learn that your new calendaring habits are failing, the root is often these two parts.

 

A weekly calendar review time keeps you moving forward. Once a week, check in from a big picture and detail view of your planner. This weekly review is familiar to those following GTD.  It is time for mind sweep to capture all ideas to keep your brain working on work and not remembering.  Capture your mind sweep on paper or digitally, then slot in all the information in your planner. Schedule your weekly calendar review at the start of your week or the end of the week.  Planning is what keeps you up to date and on track.

 

The most important element in your life changing calendaring habits is to not give up. Developing new habits takes time. This is a work in progress each week for you to create a pattern with a combination of dates and projects, as well as work-life integration.  Remember if you skip or miss a week, just get right back to your calendar tomorrow or next week.  Your tenacity  will pay off!

 

Check out my ADHD Friendly tips here on YouTube.

Understanding ADHD

Understanding adhd

The challenges of neurodiversity and ADHD are compounded when those around you doubt or don’t understand ADHD.  Those with ADHD can be perceived as inconsistent at work and home, easily distracted, and unsure of their intelligence.  It leads to misunderstanding and mistakes. Education about ADHD is the first step in helping your family, friends and work colleagues.  There are many ways to learn.

 

ADHD’s many flavors

While each individual with ADHD is different, there are both many common aspects of executive function that are part of neurodiversity. What can appear as mysterious functioning at times, can be a real pattern in ADHD.  Common challenges include sleep and self care, intense and intermittent focus, perfectionism to a high level and general executive functioning issues with starting, completing and planning.  When partners or colleagues are unaware or not knowledgeable about these challenges, discord occurs.

 

ADHD conference

Attending an ADHD conference is a way to immerse in information.  Each February, in Houston or Dallas, the ADDA-Southern Region (ADDA-SR) hosts a day long event. Each year the keynote presenter shares big information about ADHD research and lifestyle.  A series of breakout sessions caters to individuals and families on a variety of topics.  Attending an event helps you learn in an intense manner with information to process over time.

 

ADHD podcasts

Learning in small bits helps you process information quickly.  ADHD podcasts range from learning about ADHD itself and how individuals with ADHD process information.  My favorites include Translating ADHD, ADDitudemag.com, and FasterThanNormal. Each podcast shares topics with valuable information.

 

Authors and books

Books and audio books are always outstanding resources.  Favorite authors I follow include Ari Tuckman, Judith Kohlberg, Sari Solden, Nancy Ratey, Russell Barkley and Peter Shankman. The number one resource for organizing is ADD Friendly Ways to Organize by Judith Kohlberg and Kathleen Nadeau.

 

Support

Support groups exist for both you and those around you.

  • In Houston, ADDA-SR has many groups around the city that meet regularly.
  • CHADD has support for parents with Parent to Parent trainings, individuals with online forums, and support groups that meet locally depending on your location.
  • ADDitudemag offers a directory for professionals who support clients.
  • Melissa Orlov specifically offers workshops for couples who struggle with ADHD.
  • There are a many ADHD coaching associations that provide coaching support to individuals and families.
  • Medical support comes in the form of therapists, counselors and psychiatrists to diagnose.  You may wish to seek a formal diagnosis to learn more.

 

ADHD websites

Both Understood.org and ADDitudemag.com offer many resources, answers to common questions, and access to tools to use for ADHD. It’s a first step to understanding and taking steps to address lifestyle with ADHD.

 

Understanding ADHD is important to both you and those around you.  Knowledge is powerful and makes a difference in your connections with others.  With between 10-15 percent of the population with ADHD, it’s important to know true facts and not misleading information.

 

20 Quick and Easy Organizing and Productivity Tips

 

20 quick and easy organizing and productivity tips

 

Quick and easy solutions are what we need with today’s fast pace.  Quick solutions are things we can do in 15 minutes or less.  Easy…well that’s enough said for this!  Here’s 20 quick and easy organizing and productivity tips and solutions as we enter 2020.

 

1. Recycle easily

Set up a recycling station vertically with bins in your garage or mudroom. Pay for curb side recycling or set a reminder on your smart device to take recycling each week. It’s our eco-friendly nature that reinforces this solution.

 

2. Return easily

Returns pile up and we get behind.  Return easily by purchasing online only from Amazon or other companies that include a return receipt in the box.  Amazon returns can be made at Kohl’s too.

 

3. Declutter easily

Locate a donation location on your way to work or school.  Once a week or month place donations in the bag and drop off right away. More is always coming in and less is going out. This will equalize the amount of items in your home.

 

4. Donate easily

Say yes when you receive a call for donations to be picked up at your door. Mark the items in a bag or box.

 

5. Prepare meals easily

What’s the hardest thing about meal prep? It’s knowing what to fix. Ask your family for a list of favorites. Add the ingredients to your local grocery app and schedule delivery for Sunday.

 

6. Be on time easily

It’s not what to do to be on time, but what NOT to do.  What trips you up in the morning keeps you from being on time?  That includes getting on email, not allowing yourself enough time by getting up too late and doing that one last thing.  Knowing that you have a timeline in the morning with enough time to do specific tasks makes it easy to get out of the house on time. Place an analog clock at important locations in your home like your bathroom, kitchen and exit.  You see time elapsing with an analog clock.

 

7. Manage paper easily

Paper is overwhelming and arrives at an alarming rate.  Make it easy by discarding daily. Set up a recycle and shred station and make this an easy daily routine.

 

8. Schedule your time easily

Use a planner that works well with the way you think and schedule. For me it’s a hybrid paper and electronic planner. Pull out your planner as soon as you see a date and schedule your time.

 

9. Coordinate plans easily

Are you and your family or partner on the same page?  Make it easy with an online planner. Everyone enters dates and everyone can access plans.

 

10. Make routines easier

Routines are the backbone of productivity. These ensure you are doing what you intend on a regular basis.   Make routines easier with assigning a day or days of the week to those tasks that need automating.  It can be Money Monday, Admin Monday or Laundry on Monday.

 

11. Check email easier

Email floods in!  There’s little time to process and catch up. You don’t have to be at it’s beck and call. Schedule 3 times a day that work for you to slow the tide.

 

12.  Clear your desk easier

Is your desk top a chaotic and crowded space? Designate an unprocessed incoming paper spot to drop papers you have to review or work on.  Keeping these off your desk frees up space and your colleagues know where to place these papers.

 

13.  Know your most important tasks

Prioritizing can be a challenge when everything seems equally important. Write a list of your 3 Most Important Tasks (MITs) for the week. It will keep you on track and ensure success.

 

14. Write a note easily

Hand written notes are appreciated and a way to connect.  Order stationary online and keep the notes, stamps and address labels in your desk drawer. Save a few minutes after lunch to write your notes.

 

15. Connect with a friend easily

Keep all your contacts accessible in your data online.  For me it’s Outlook and it can also be gmail.  When you think of a friend or colleague, send a quick text.  Knowing you are thinking of them is that special touch.

 

16. Practice self care easily

Set a bedtime for yourself.  Get ready for bed early, brush teeth and get in your pajamas well before lights out.

 

17. Corral technology easily

Keep technology ready for the next day for you and your family with a common charging space in a common area. Also, it’s easy to find and take with you the next day.

 

18. Gather ideas and thoughts easily

Our minds are a cluttered space. Choose an online app to help you keep things clear. Trello, Asana, Google docs or Notes apps help you hold and organize all these details.

 

19. Strategize easily

Take a big picture approach to work, life and work life integration by scheduling time away.  It’s easiest to step back when you have time to ponder.  That can be a day or multiple days.  Taking time to strategize gives you a more complete view of your accomplishments.

 

20. Set your intentions easily

It’s a new decade. Use your word of the year to propel yourself forward.  That is a word that focuses you on your big intentions this year.

 

Take only one of these quick and easy tips to own this week, month or year. Making it easy makes things happen!

 

 

 

Hassle free Holidays for Families with ADHD

 

Hassle free holidays for families with adhd

 

Holidays are merry times for families.  For moms, dads, and family members with ADHD, there can be glitches with planning, timing, and finishing up in time for family time together. When it comes to family events, executive function limitations interfere with holidays in the ways we celebrate, the gifts we share and the time we spend with family.  Here are solutions to create hassle free holidays for families with ADHD.

 

Problem: Everything is important during the holidays. What do I do first and when do I do what? It all seems overwhelming.

Holidays can be magical and meaningful with planning. That planning starts with a calendar.  Ask your family about their special family traditions.  It’s tempting to say yes to everything, but the key take away is to limit your plans, decorating and parties. Once your family weights in, be sure all the family has access to the calendar to know the final plans and be a part of the fun.

 

Holiday plans require more time to complete. Start early on all holiday activities. It seems too early to start your holiday planning in October but it is not. For cards, take the photo in October, choose cards and have these printed in early November, and address the cards the week of Thanksgiving.    For gifts, go through your gift closet in October, finalize shopping in November, then mail presents the first week of December.  As you can see, October organizing and planning is key to holiday success. Set a deadlines for each task. A deadline will help you focus your time and energy.

 

Problem: There’s so much to do! How do I do it all?

There is no way to do it all during the holidays.  It’s also not possible to be the only family member decorating, gift giving and baking.  It’s time to look for help. Ask your family to partner with you, working in pairs to accomplish tasks. There’s many ways to get help around you.  There’s on demand delegation. You can find help with online tools to hire extra help at this time of year.  Take the semi-homemade approach and take help where you can get it from pre-cut groceries and delivery services. Ask teens who want to earn money for help with small tasks.  Be open to asking for help and accepting the “not completely perfect” solutions. When you spend extra time on a task, be sure it is valuable enough and worthy of that extra effort.

 

Problem: I can’t find the perfect gift for everyone on my list.

Find creative solutions to gift giving. Rather than many homemade gifts, choose one gift that includes an experience. Keep your gift giving for those who are especially close. Choose a small gift card for those who are service providers. Choose an organizing gift that can help you stay organized all year long. Order online in order to save time and money.  There are many ways to share the joy of gift giving.

 

Problem:  I am worn out before the fun begins.  I want to enjoy the holidays too.

Holidaze sets in early with too much to eat and too little sleep. Holiday fun is diminished with too little self care.  Be sure to keep true to your routines during this busy time of year. It’s easy to pass on the routines when you might miss out on fun.  Routines and self care make sure that you truly enjoy your holidays.

Give yourself the gift of extra self care. Extra self care looks like an afternoon to read your favorite magazine, a soak in the tub with lavender, or an early bed time.  Extra self care pays off in being ready to have fun.

 

Hassle free holidays start with knowing where the hassles begin and how to address these ahead of time.  Knowing your options and resources make a difference for holiday times.

 

What to expect when working with a Professional Organizer when you have ADHD

adhd

 

Starting in the early 2000, I noticed my clients having similar challenges. It was usually a love hate relationship with time, paper and stuff.   That’s when I learned about ADHD.  Since that time, I have been working with clients with ADHD and helping make the changes they want in their lives.   Because of our work together, these clients have started living the life they have imagined.  What is it like for us to work together?

 

What to expect before we meet

My clients reach out through email or phone, bravely taking a first step.  It’s courageous because they have finally recognized how asking for help can make a difference. That courage comes from a deep longing to create systems and routines that have been unnatural for them.

 

When we initially talk or meet, my role is a listener. I am hearing what are the challenges.  I am not judging.  Because our work is non-judgmental, we are from the start creating a trust relationship.

 

It’s common that my clients can feel anxious about our first meeting. Perhaps it is about whether there is “hope” for a solution, or whether there will be judgement, or another feeling.  After we meet, that all changes.

 

What to expect when we meet

Our meetings begin with an assessment. It’s further talk and review of goals, expectations, and ho we will work best together.  There is a lot of verbal processing going on! My clients are talkers, who as they talk, ideas become clear.   We review the process of decluttering, organizing, and maintaining that we will work on together.

 

My clients and I establish a rhythm to our work for decluttering.  Our work always begins with “what to keep and what to let go.”  It’s a conversation at times and it’s a quick sort at times.   If my client gets stuck, at times we put something aside to talk further and at times we keep it for a while. My clients often don’t know what to let go of because it is not clear how much of an item they own.  We gather items together while we are decluttering.  In the end, I bring items to donate to facilitate decluttering.

 

As we organize, my clients and I determine categories together.  There’s grouping, there’s placing, and then there’s products to help.  Many of my clients have lots of products to help us organize. We can place these more effectively together.

 

What to expect after we meet

Organizing is a journey.  It’s not over after our series of meetings.  We discuss what maintenance looks like, how to create routines to maintain and what a maintenance visit together looks like.  These new perspectives on organizing help my clients keep organized. We talk about when we might meet again as needed.

 

What to expect

My clients have recently decided that they want to make a big change.  They have hit a point where the time has come to invest in that change on many levels.

The core of our work together is trust, education, support, and communication.  Knowing how my clients work best and sharing basic knowledge about ADHD are underpinnings of our work together.  My support and establishing a team to support my clients are part of our work together.  Communication, verbal processing, and non-judgemental discussions are elements that move our work together forward.

 

Curious about ADHD and getting organized?  Let’s connect!