Incorporating Essentialism Into Your Standards

 

Essentialism

 

 Essentialism isn’t about getting more done in less time. It’s about getting only the right things done.

 

Are you looking for a strategy to help you do less and own less but you are not a minimalist?  I have found that Essentialism works for me! It gives me the opportunity to do what I love and own what I love.

 

What is essentialism?

I have been a  proponent of essentialism for a while now. Greg McKeown’s book, Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less is about prioritizing, which is knowing who, what and why something is essential. “The Way of the Essentialist involves doing less, but better, so you can make the highest possible contribution.”  I read this many years ago and it has stayed with me.  I find that drilling down to essentialism keeps me purposeful, intentional, and productive.

 

What does essentialism have to do with our next steps?

Before COVID-19, we have to admit we were on a hamster wheel with an endless list of actions and endless opportunities to purchase. Now we know what it feels like to do less.  It gives us the opportunity to be selective about what we are doing, who we are with, and what choices we can make.  We can regain control of our choices to use our time and energy to make a difference. Even more, after time has passed since COVID, we want to live intentionally and purposefully.

 

Where can we apply this concept?

Wonder where I apply the concept of Essentialism? It starts with what is in my home and what I own. I consider what is essential to my work and self-care. For me what is essential is a limited number of work clothes and play clothes. Limiting these helps me save time and money. Digging deep into my core values, I know that it is essential for me to spend time with family and stay connected to friends. My calendar reflects these essentials. I love that I can define these elements and stay true to my purpose in what I own and what I do.

Here is an example of where I have used Essentialism for myself. A product comes to mind that will make my life easier. I sit with that idea for a day, thinking about how essential that is to my daily life. I research the cost and prioritize the improvement it might make. I purchase it with intention and when it arrives I place it where it will be used frequently. It is now essential to what I do each day. I have deemed this item absolutely essential to my well-being and the order of my life. That item might be a new keurig pod flavor or a new bag to travel. The process works well for every purchase and every new activity in my life.

 

Where can I learn more?

Learning about Essentialism and its role in others’ lives helps you evaluate for yourself. Check out this podcast to learn more and be inspired.

4 replies
  1. Seana Turner
    Seana Turner says:

    I loved this term the first time I heard it. It has a positive aspect that minimalism lacks (although I think they really are very similar).

    Great example about how essentialism might impact a purchase. I think as I get older, I’m more in touch what what truly is essential to me, and it isn’t very much. I want a lot more than is essential, but I can be content with less.

    Since it is in the 40s this morning, for example, having a source of heat feels pretty essential!

  2. Linda Samuels
    Linda Samuels says:

    Last week I wrote a post and shared the question from Yota Schneider, one of my good friends and a life coach. She asked, “Is it necessary?” It’s so connected to what you wrote about here with Essentialism. What is necessary or essential in our lives? The question cuts through all the noise and becomes so helpful in determining how we chose to spend our time, energy, and resources.

  3. Ellen
    Ellen says:

    I love that we are driving home the importance of necessity. We have been blessed with abundance and can be off track with what is a need as a result.

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