ADHD and Team Support

Creating an ADHD support team

 

As an organizing coach, I’ve noticed an important element for my clients.  My clients need a “boost”to get tasks done, such as an extra set of hands.  They need Vitamin C, called that by Edward Hallowell, the C representing connection.  At times my clients stumble when they don’t know a skill or technology gets too complicated. At times they need to verbally process information, create a plan or help getting started.  All of these pieces add up to adding an element called support.

 

What do you mean by support?

Support can appear like many different things. It can be physical support with extra help to accomplish something. Think of it as someone on the end of the furniture you are moving.  Support can also mean being body double, where someone is in a space alongside you, doing a parallel activity or sitting quietly.  Support can mean adding more players to your team, like a therapist, house cleaner, or administrative assistant.  When working together, we process what kind of team members can support you best.

 

Why do brain based conditions like ADHD especially need support?

All of us need support.  Brain based conditions especially need support with planning and executing. Executive function is weak in the ADHD brain.  Time management and paper management need boosting with the ADHD brain.  With ADHD, there are many projects with many open items.  Often an assistant prioritizes these projects. For these reasons, having a team in place can amplify what you want to accomplish.

 

Emotional support is important.  An organizer coach, ADHD coach, or therapist can play a role in emotional support. Emotions are intense and can affect every day living.  Normalizing these emotions and processing emotions are part of working as a team.

Are you reluctant to ask for support?

Without a doubt, many of us have had experiences that have left us vulnerable to ask for support. It might have been unintentional however has left us feeling that we can’t ask for help.  There’s no shame in being vulnerable, as noted by Brene Brown. It’s in that moment we can benefit the most from creating our best team.

 

What are some ways to find support?

  • Find a clutter buddy or paper partner to help you declutter. Your partner tethers you to the task by keeping you in the space you are working in. Having a partner means you are committing to what you intend to accomplish.  A partner is there when you are stuck with a decision.
  • Ask a friend to be a body double. That’s a person who works in the same space you are working, however on their own task or project. By virtue of that person being in the space, you’re benefitting from energy and connection.
  • Virtual support is available online for you.  CHADD offers classes for yourself, for you as a parents, for teachers and others.  You can volunteer and support others as well.
  • Look for an ADHD therapist, Organizer Coach or ADHD coach specifically trained for working with brain based conditions.
  • Support can look like many different things. It can be your housecleaner, your nanny, or your baby sitter. It can also look like your bible study group at church or your pilates class. Look around and see who is available for you.

I find support in creating a team for my work and home. I walk with a partner, go to pilates weekly, have a helper at home and collaborate with my colleagues. Not only is teamwork and support help me run my business, it makes my work and life more fun!

 

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6 replies
  1. Linda Samuels
    Linda Samuels says:

    It’s so important to get the support we need in whatever form it appears. And finding the right “team” of people that boost us and enhance our lives is so enervating. I love how you fully embrace this idea of team both for others and in your own work and personal life. It’s inspiring!

  2. Seana Turner
    Seana Turner says:

    I am in complete agreement with this truth. I’ve always felt it to be true, but since working, I’ve had so many clients articulate the value of having me there with them, keeping them on track and simply walking alongside through the task at hand. Our drive to be independent undermines the value of support. I think most successful people have support networks, whether they acknowledge them or not.

  3. Ellen
    Ellen says:

    I agree with you Seana! When I ask my clients what was most valuable about our session, it’s often that I was present! Support looks like different things to different people. It’s creating your support for you that works best!

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