Updates to Your Emergency Preparedness Plan

 

updates to your emergency preparedness plan

 

Every year we prepare for possible hurricanes here in Houston. Now we know that there are many different emergencies that crop up. Preparing in advance helps us in the moment of the situation but also with feeling capable of helping others as well. Here are six updates you can make for your smart preparedness strategy.

 

Communicate your emergency plan with your family.

Every family needs a plan for evacuation, shelter in place, and communication. The first step is to host a conversation discussing what is required in each situation. Discuss situations that require these options and see if there is consensus. Review what is needed in each case and work as a team to assemble what is required. Having a common plan and communicating about that plan helps everyone feel more secure.

 

Review your insurance coverage.

Check your coverage for flood, wind, and other disasters in order to know your specific coverage. Learn more from your trusted insurance agent or reach out for further information if needed. The first step is to include your documented coverage with your important documents.  From here you can add coverage as needed depending on your situation.

 

Update your emergency kit.

Every home has an emergency kit and September is a great time to update what is in the kit. The first step is to check batteries and perishables. Check if medicines have expired. If there are new additions as technology has changed, this is a good time to review. Since the Spring of 2020, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended people include additional items in their kits such as masks, hand sanitizer, and infant formula. Be sure your pet supplies are included in your kit.

 

Ensure continuous backup of devices

Backing up your data ensures you always have access to critical information. Be sure you use a reliable, consistent, automated backup daily. The first step is to choose a backup system and install this.

 

Prepare a home inventory.

Home inventory is a list of your assets. There are many options. The first step is to choose an inventory system that works for you. The simplest system is a home video of your assets, paired with purchase receipts. Also available are online inventories that can include photos and videos. The home inventory is as necessary as your important documents in keeping your assets secure.

 

Gather all your important documents.

It can be overwhelming to gather your documents together. The first step is a list of what you need and what needs to be most current. Take 30 minutes once a week for several weeks to find these online or paper documents.

We know the value of proactive preparation for emergencies of all sorts. Take steps now for updating or finalizing your preparations.

 

 

 

 

3 Tips for Reducing Cognitive Load

reducing cognitive load

 

Have you heard the term cognitive load? “Cognitive load” is the amount of information that working memory can hold at one time. The term is often used in the learning environment. However, we have an ever-increasing amount of cognitive load, especially since the pandemic. We are holding a lot of information in our heads, often novel information that is being processed. The information in working memory is more and more complex. Because we are incorporating and processing the information, it feels unwieldy to think.  Happily, there are a variety of tools to help us reduce that load.

 

Use a reliable, easy-to-use capture tool.

Write stuff down. Use an app to capture information. The less we keep in our heads the more we free up the cognitive load. First capture, then prioritize the information. By capturing information it is no longer in working memory. By evaluating you shorten your list of tasks.

  • Be intentional about your paper capture tool. A notebook keeps all the information together. A disk binder system creatively gives you the opportunity to create sections for information. Your binder becomes a safe place for all information.
  • Use apps wisely. The Notes app is an easy-to-use system.
  • Use your system consistently for the best off-loading of cognitive load. That is to have a routine to add to, delete and review your information. GTD, Getting Stuff Done, uses a capture and review system with a weekly planning time.

 

Add routines to daily living.

Daily routines lighten your cognitive load by creating an auto-pilot for daily and weekly self-care. Routines add consistency which adds serenity.

  • Use a checklist for your daily routines. Dry erase board checklists can help start or end the day. Your family will benefit from this as well. No more yelling at your family to get stuff done too.
  • Create a parallel schedule for your day with getting up and going to bed at the same time. You will be sure to be well rested and better able to think.
  • Track your success with visual signs of success. Whether it is a checkmark on your planner or a habit tracker app, you will enjoy your success knowing this data.

 

Be intentional about new information, tasks, and projects.

Intention can lighten your cognitive load. Paying attention to the purpose and related actions that are behind a task brings clarity. Limit new projects to no more than 2 simultaneous projects and have pre-set rules for decisions as new information comes along. Remember that anxiety can affect your cognitive load and create stress and paralysis. When you give yourself time to process and create a plan, you gain control and create successful outcomes. Intentional actions include giving yourself time to plan, time to process information, and time to act on the plan. All of this can be accomplished with a fresh perspective and time blocking.

 

Remember the phrase, “Almost everything will work again if you unplug it for a few minutes, including you.” Ultimately, that is the remedy for reducing cognitive load.

 

Getting Derailed and Getting Back on Track

getting derailed and getting back on track

 

You are moving forward, being productive, getting stuff done, and taking care of yourself. Then all of a sudden – poof! – this vanishes. It could be from being overwhelmed, being unprepared for life’s circumstances, being unmotivated, or just because. All of a sudden, after so much effort, you feel derailed and unsure of what to do next. So what to do to get back on track?

When you get derailed by too many projects

Additional projects are added to your responsibilities at work. In your enthusiasm, you add on more home chores like repairs and home renovation.

Use your task list wisely. If you are overwhelmed, make a list of all the responsibilities and tasks. Then assign these to time blocks for getting these started and completed. At home, take on no new responsibilities until you feel more in control. There are many project management apps that can help you organize your projects and time. 

 

When you get derailed by a lack of motivation

Lack of motivation can occur when you feel overwhelmed or lack purpose behind a project. You might start with a lot of interest and enthusiasm, and then those emotions wane.

Break projects into small steps to feel consistent success. When you see your success, it builds in motivation to continue. If you come to a point where you don’t remember or see the end goal, use a mind map to reconsider the outcome and what is important to you about the completion of the project. Bring in additional team members to add interest and motivation.  

When you get derailed by vacation

You have really enjoyed your time off, and now it is time to get back to work. There’s so much to do and you are not ready to roll.

Set up for success with a catch-up day. On the first day, you return, establish a no meeting policy. Set a time to catch up on email and connect with colleagues on projects. Use a task list continuously or start now to keep a list of all responsibilities. 

 

When you get derailed by “life happening”

“Life is happening!” That is when there is a new relationship, a loss of a family member, a job change, moving to a new home, or multiple circumstances happen simultaneously.

Self-care is the key to getting through situations. First, start with a good night’s rest and get support. Support can be meeting with a therapist or coach, seeking medical attention, adding a team member to your work group, or delegating to a paid helper. There are times that there is too much for us to handle. 

 

When you get derailed in general

You are a marvel at your task list, getting to the gym, and eating healthy. Then you stop.

Everyone gets derailed at some time. Don’t fret about it –  just do it (whatever that was) and start again!

Use These Schedules for Back to School Routines

back to school routines, schedules and checklists

 

Families with ADHD need reliable and consistent routines and schedules. That applies to the parents and the kids with ADHD. Setting up the structure of the morning and evening with positive expectations and well-established schedules helps improve everyone’s balance and set the pace for the day. Here are suggested schedules to help your family back to school success.

 

Getting buy-in with your family

Start with a family meeting to gain momentum with your routines. Families intuitively know and feel the benefits. Get official buy -in with a conversation highlighting that routines preclude making every decision every day and therefore offer stress relief.  Making multiple decisions every day wears everyone out. Following the structure of routines helps achieve their goals, whether that is getting a good night’s rest, getting better grades, or having more time for games. With a schedule, everyone knows what to do and when to do it without nagging. The results are more of what everyone wants which is time together to have fun.

Next, move on to designing a schedule that works. Be realistic about what you can accomplish and the time it takes for tasks. While it is hard for those with ADHD to sense how long a task takes, give yourself time to get tasks done and a deadline to do this.

 

Writing out the morning schedule

Getting everyone ready and out the door on time is the priority in the morning.  Prepare as much as you can the night before using a landing strip for backpacks and setting a wake-up alarm. Avoid adding in extra tasks and emails in the morning. A simply written schedule should be:

7:00 wake up, take meds, wash face, get dressed

7:15 eat breakfast, pack lunch

7:30 grab backpack, head to car

Keep it simple with only the highlights of this routine. Post this routine where your family sees it and the point of use. For kiddos, that’s the bathroom mirror.

 

Write a checklist for the afternoon schedule

Afternoon schedules have more to do and require a checklist to be sure it is all accomplished.  There is homework, activities, and dinner together.  Establishing a set study routine eliminates the choice of what time to start. Hiring a homework helper to reinforce settling into homework time. Review what is expected during homework time to ensure completion. End the evening with fun.

4:00 Snack and chat

4:30 Homework time at dinner table, kitchen table or home office alongside you

6:00 Gym, music, scouts, or other activity

7:00 Dinner together

7:30 Clean up and prep lunches

8:00 Bath, books and bed

Adjust this checklist depending on your child’s age and stage. The flow of activities is the same. Parents of middle and high schoolers are more frequently limiting gaming time during the week. Set a time of day for technology to start and end, including turning off wifi. It’s easier for you as a parent to enforce these times with this routine. Post this checklist at the family command center for everyone to see it.

Dinner time together helps everyone stay connected. Work around activities and church to find time together each evening to sit and enjoy time together. Make dinner simple with cereal or sandwiches, kids cooking, or healthy takeaway dinner. Eating a meal together without technology keeps everyone connected. Try conversation starters like high and low, talking about the high points and low points of the day with your kids, or other conversation starters.

Wind down with a Bedtime Routine

Bedtime is crucial for those with ADHD.  For those with ADHD, it takes a sleep routine to fall asleep. Set a time to get ready for bed with extra time for quiet conversation with you. Encourage relaxation by turning off all blue light devices an hour before bedtime and placing these in the common charging spot. Use bath time as a wind-down mechanism with lavender bath salts. A cool, dark room with quiet music or a sound machine set the stage for sleep for kids and adults.

 

Keep routines going

Here are the tricks to routines – keep it, simple sweetie! Start with a small routine, and add that single step to another existing routine. Make it visual so that everyone can remember and see the steps for the routines.

Remember, routines keep going because you as know the value and power of routines. Routines can be re-started every week to stay consistent.  Don’t give up because on the first day or week the routines are not in place. It takes practice and the conviction you are a family who follows routines to keep these in place.

 

 

 

Getting Back into Work Mode

getting back into workflow

 

This summer record numbers of people are taking time off and going on vacation. Being away has so much value in helping us reset. However, getting back into the workflow can be difficult after vacation. Check out these strategies to help you transition back to work more quickly.

 

Write vacation preparation notes

Set yourself up for success with notes before you leave. Additional notes on the next steps help you catch up upon return. Share these notes with colleagues who are on your team.

 

Schedule no meetings the first day back

Give yourself time to go through email, check your schedule and set priorities the first day after vacation. By prioritizing getting organized you are ready to get back into the workflow. From my own experience, you are not ready to get back to full speed that first day. Pace yourself with having a buffer day.

 

Review your planner and your tasks to prioritize

Returning from travel, at work, you are likely in the middle of many projects and at home you definitely need groceries. Review your planner to catch up on what is next for your planner. At home, check in with what is needed immediately to run smoothly. Taking this review time gives you a sense of direction and where to spend your time first.

 

Set a reasonable schedule for the week of your return

Don’t overdo and overbook your first week back. Diving back into a full schedule seems smart because you have been away. Give yourself ample self-care and breaks during the first week back with extra time for walks, preparation for each day, and lots of hydration.

 

Set aside time to work through email

Email is the most difficult part of the return to work. Having a plan helps you gain control. Be sure to set your out-of-office reminder so that your colleagues know you are not going to respond until you return. Then, use divide your time to work through email when you return. Set aside a time block for a high-level review of email and learn what is urgent. You can respond to this quickly. Then, set another time block to calendar dates, add information to projects, and work through what has come in while you were away. By creating two segments for your email, you can feel more in charge and be more responsive.

 

Return to routines quickly

Unpack your luggage, order groceries, start laundry and get to bed on time. Returning to your routines quickly helps you ramp up your productivity.

 

Give yourself grace throughout the first week back to work. It is going to take time to regain momentum. Having these strategies will help you be proactive about your workflow after your time away.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 Strategies for a Positive School Year

 

5 strategies for a positive school year

 

Some students love school and thrive, but many are anxious. Grades often feel like the only measure of success for kids. A positive school year builds self-confidence and self-esteem. Our goal as families is to build self-esteem and we can do this with a structured, intentional approach.

 

Start off strong with self-care

The transition to school can be rough. Moving from little structure to lots of structure, no bedtime to early bedtime, and getting up early are all opportunities for crankiness. Start the transition to school a week ahead with earlier bedtimes. Getting more read helps everyone. Make a plan for breakfast, lunch at dinner to smooth the transition. Looking forward to community times together as well as nutritious options is a happy thought. As the school year progresses, self-care is where to turn to when the going gets rough.

 

Embrace support

Start the school year with the support needed. If your student struggled with math, have a tutor in place. Subject area tutors get your student on track or ahead early on in the school year. Bigger support can look like a homework study partner, a coach, or a therapist. Bringing in support helps your student know you understand their needs. Your strong support by building a bigger team for your student shows you understand their needs. Be open to adding support throughout the school year.

 

Acknowledge successes

From the beginning of the year, acknowledge successes of all sorts. Praise is a powerful strategy for building self-esteem. That can be a strong work ethic, tenacity, friendliness, kindness, inclusivity, and other qualities your student is developing. Good grades will come along as confidence builds. Also, embrace a growth mindset with perspectives when things don’t go well. Resilience balanced with realistic expectations creates good self-esteem.

 

Add in options

Students need optimal choices to encourage responsibility and create ownership. You encourage taking responsibility for homework and home chores when there are a few choices. Set up a schedule for both with your student so that they will buy into the work. Offer levels of flexibility and independence as part of the choices. That would be when the time is set or how much supervision is possible. Be clear about the outcome no matter the options. Using a chart with clear expectations makes clear the outcome.

 

Always remember it’s about the relationship

Self-esteem and self-confidence flourish in a loving environment. Your relationship is the most important factor. Students with ADHD often feel they’re letting you down, doing things wrong, or not being ‘good.’ Protect your relationship by providing perspectives when things get out of kilter. Change can happen when you focus on support, strengths, and common ground.

 

 

 

 

5 Things To Do Before School Starts

5 things to do before school starts

 

A successful school year starts at the end of July with preparation and organization.  With the start of school just a few weeks away, you have just enough time to be ready with the stuff you need and the routines to embrace that you will feel positive about the start of the school year.

Organize School Stuff Together

Engage your students with organizing school supplies together. Gather all the supplies from your home and categorize them. Next, find the “home” for these items and gather organizing supplies. Label your supplies for easy access. Place supplies in a zipper case in a divided backpack to use at school.  Add a supply caddy for your homework station.

 

Create Homework Spots

Having multiple homework spots keeps homework engaging. The best areas for this are near supervised devices and computers. Some options might be your dining room, your office, or at any large table where you can see the screen and there is ample space to spread out. Be sure to designate a landing strip at the door your family exits for fully loaded backpacks ready to leave the house. A packed backpack is the last homework step.

 

Plan After School Activities and Tutoring Help

Get ahead by planning afterschool and tutoring help. Physical activity after a day of sitting in school helps students focus, sleep better and build self-esteem. There are many homework helpers available from tutoring companies to high school students. Set up afterschool activities that allow for a positive afterschool and evening routine.

 

Review Calendars

Families need two calendars for school.

  • The Family Calendar either digital or paper enhance communication and collaboration. With this calendar, everyone knows the dates school starts, school holidays, family vacations, and all family activities. Reviewing the Family Calendar weekly at the family meeting keeps everyone on the same page.
  • The Student Planner either digital or paper holds the list of assignments, tests, and projects that the student is responsible for. This list is what is used every day for homework. Teachers offer a Week At A Glance (WAG) online on the school website. Information for the Student Planner is a consolidation of all class work and after-school activity dates.

 

Plan for positivity and self-care

No matter if you are a parent or student, you will thrive by including self-care in your plan. That includes community self-care like laundry, meals and taking care of your home. With a chart for your family to work with, you can partner up with responsibilities. Included for self-care is an organizing reset each week. That is each Sunday evening in preparation for the new week ahead. Individual self-care includes setting a bedtime with adequate rest. A positive plan for self-care is a priority for your best school year.

 

More tips on Back to School here!

Teaching your Teen Time Management

teaching your teen time management

 

 

Your kids have known how to tell time since elementary school.  But even with this background, as teens, they are late, don’t get chores completed, and may turn in assignments late to school.  Time management is more than just knowing how to read a clock.  It’s a struggle for teens to know what to do and how to get things done with time management.

 

According to Psychology Today, time management is just one of the four most critical areas for teens today.  With the level of brain development, teens are not fully equipped for time management.  Because brain development continues into the twenties, teens benefit from our coaching them with time management through high school and college.  Teens are unsure of what to do first, how long it will take to complete, and how to get started.  Teen time management includes coaching in prioritizing, initiation and procrastination, and duration of a task or project.

 

Prioritizing

What’s important and should be done first? That’s a question not only teens struggle with.  Parents don’t always agree on this between themselves.  How do we know what’s most important? It can be a matter of focus for all of us.  However,  you can help your child make these decisions by helping them process what needs to be done.

  • Encourage your teen to write down their priorities. For most kids that includes school grades, friends, church, and activities. If there are too many priorities, too many sports, or too many extracurricular activities, you can coach them to understand just how much time it takes for each activity.
  • Grid out with your kids the time available and where their priorities fit on the grid. Time blocking works well because kids can see what they have to do and when they will be doing it. That includes time for self care like sleep too. Using a paper or digital planner makes time more visual.
  • Set aside time to plan. Weekly planning time with their planner each Sunday or Monday gives your teen time to acknowledge everything that is on their plate and also record due dates. With so much information coming in by text and social media, they need time to consolidate it all in one place.

 

Initiation and Procrastination

Getting started on a task can be the hardest part of any project. Also known as initiation, those with executive function challenges find planning engaging but getting started more difficult. Procrastination can be from fear, lack of skill, or lack of motivation.

  • Plan an initiation strategy. For many, the “warm-up” to the project is gathering the materials, reviewing the instructions, or checking online with others in the class. Creating your own “warm-up” strategy will help for all upcoming assignments.
  • Make it fun to get started.  Find an innovative way to start a project.  You can add in technology or a gadget, work with a partner, or create a new perspective on the project.
  • Schedule the time to start a project. At that time, use a timer, set for 15 minutes, to help you get started.
  • Brainstorm the costs of procrastination. What’s at stake? What will happen? What are the consequences of not getting started soon enough? Coach your student through this process to verbalize the costs.
  • Set up a compelling, organized environment.  A clear workspace, quiet or white noise, and easy to access school supplies make it easier to get started.

Duration

We don’t know how long it takes to get a specific task done. But we do know that we can guess and set a time on our calendar to get a task done.

  • Help your teen create routines that take just 5 minutes. Making their bed, placing laundry in the basket, and putting trash away are 3 small tasks that take less than 5 minutes altogether. Your teen might think these take much longer. Write out routines with only 3 steps so that your teen isn’t overwhelmed.
  • Create more time awareness with more analog clocks.  Clocks should be in all your spaces to be sure you are gauging your time.
  • Your teen can set a timer when they start a task. Clocking the time will help them know how long a task takes.
  • Break big projects or tasks into baby steps.  Map out small sections of a project, and assign a time and date to accomplish them.  Nothing seems as overwhelming when it’s broken into smaller chunks.

 

Transition time

Building in transition time helps your teen be on time. That is the time that is between activities and moving from place to place. Your teen may not allow enough time to get ready, get to school, or clock in for a job. Coach your teen on how much time it takes to drive from home to school, then set use a timer to realistically learn the amount of time it takes. Having sufficient transit time helps your tee feel more confident and less stressed.

 

Tools for time management

Planners

 

Focusing apps

 

On your smartphone

  • Clock with timer for getting started and timing how long a task takes
  • Pandora playlist for organizing or homework time
  • Notes for making lists
  • Reminders and more tech

 

It takes practice, practice, and practice to learn the skills of time management. Don’t get impatient with your teen about how long it takes.  Every experience is a learning opportunity here.

 

 

 

Survival Tips for College Students with ADHD

Survival tips for college students with adhd

 

Starting college is one of many big transitions in education and life skills for our kids with ADHD.  Your student might have a strong start with high school successes. Now is the time to plan for thriving in a new environment.  Begin by talking through these strategies for students starting or continuing their education.

 

Be prepared for classes with trusted tools and a time management plan.

Unlike high school with lots of structure, starting college creates demands on executive function with time management, routines, and distractions.  Know what you will use as a planner and how you will set up your time by attending class, setting up a time to study, and knowing when you have time to go out.  At first, this is hard because you are not sure how much time your out-of-class assignments will take. Handle this by setting up study time in a variety of locations to get accustomed to the routines of studying and the demands of classwork. Set up your class schedule so that your daily routine is similar every day.

Capture information and prioritize your time. Record everything in your planner and use a task list if you need to be sure of all your assignments. Add a chart with your schedule in writing or program reminders on your smartphone. Prioritize important activities so that you earn the grades you want.

 

Build a support system

Transition to college is starting over with support. Creating a support system for when things get rough is your best first step on campus.  Find the right support on campus at the disabilities office and check out the academic success office. Both are easy ways to find strong support academically immediately. For health, check out the on-campus health clinic. Your medication can be sent locally to the pharmacy in your new town. You can hire a coach or talk with a campus counselor when you feel overwhelmed.

 

Set up automated reminders for routines and reminders

Automation is a wonderful way to be sure stuff gets done. Reminder apps are helpful for making new routines and supporting existing routines. This will help you remember your medication, when to get to class and when to start your new school work routine. Set up automated refills for your medication through your pharmacy.

 

Organize your stuff

College dorm rooms are tiny, shared spaces. A lot of order and just a little stuff makes it easy to organize. If you have too much, bring some stuff home during breaks. Be sure your valuables, including your medicine, are safely stored, and organized. Most of your schoolwork will be digital so stay organized online with digital folders. Store what you use frequently with easy access and portability. Work with an ADHD coach or ask an organized friend for help.

 

Life learning

There are more responsibilities as you are on your own and become independent. That is laundry, meals, and finances to learn about and master. You are practicing these from the start as you incorporate these responsibilities into each week at college. If you find that you are without funds, falling behind in laundry, or generally lacking self-care, it’s time to think about the process. An ADHD coach can help you set a schedule for these life learning skills.

Money management

Learning about finances takes time. In the beginning, it is about keeping within a budget, which is likely new.  Try setting a weekly budget for specific types of spending to track what you are spending.  Write a list of what these are and track them. You can start tracking your spending with Mint or Every Dollar.

 

Self care

All night studying, late-night parties keep you from getting a good night’s rest. Junk food and vending machines are not the best for ADHD brains. Sitting all day without walking or exercising can keep you from sharp thinking. All of this is to say keep your self-care a priority by taking walks, eating healthy, and getting 8 hours of sleep as much as possible. You are thinking  – everyone at college stays up late and eats junk. As a person with ADHD,  this will impact you more than those with neurotypical brains.

 

The struggle is real

Your years away from home are times of great learning both personally and academically. Start with one area to work on and build from there. These tips are a good first start at college success. Maintaining these are the hardest part! As the semester goes on, you may feel more overwhelmed and in a rut rather than a routine. Remember that every day is a fresh start. Check-in with an ADHD Coach for a fresh perspective and get a good night’s rest.

7 Top Tips to Stay Organized During College Application Season

Top Tips to Stay Organized During College Application Season

 

The summer before senior year of high school, during the months of July and August, is the time to start applying for colleges.  There are many steps in the application process.  By starting early you will be able to pace yourself and do your best work. Being organized about the college application process makes applying easier.

 

Organize your college files

As soon as your search begins, you will be receiving brochures and information from potential college choices. Set up a paper filing system to hold these materials, especially as you narrow your choices. A file box with hanging files labeled with your college names makes it easy to file.

 

Organize your email

Colleges send a lot of information by email. If you are already good at managing your inbox, keep the same email address. If not, create a new email address just for incoming college information. Use this email address for all college materials. Make a note on your planner to check your email daily as you begin applying to colleges.

 

Organize your college choices

Start with a college spreadsheet that includes all the colleges to which you will be applying. Include all the steps that are required to complete the application. Completing this sheet may require some research to learn the deadlines and other details. Check to see if you can use the Common App to apply to all your college choices. A google sheet listing the name of the college and required information helps you stay organized and on top of deadlines. Mark your calendar with these important dates to be sure you are on time in sending in required information.

 

Name of college Application type Priority date Deadlines for application Completed and submitted (date) Application fee amount and paid Supplemental essays and date submitted Transcripts forms submitted and due date Resume attached SAT or ACT sent Acceptance

 

Establish a timeline

College applications can be sent for early decision, early admission, rolling and regular admission. Be sure to complete according to these deadlines for your colleges of choice. Create a work schedule and stay on track with it. Working on college applications takes time. Give yourself a series of two-hour sessions to complete each step for college applications. Online apps allow you to complete sections and save that section to break your application into manageable chunks of time.

 

Essay organizing

Choose a college essay topic that gives you the opportunity to share your thoughts and show your talents. Start early to give yourself time to do your best work. Ask for help from those who can proofread your essay for grammar and topic. Connect to those with expertise to help here.

 

Apps that help

There are many practical apps that help you with the college application process. Get organized with a google sheet to track your college requirements. You can write your essay in a Google Doc to share it with your proofreader. Evernote or Notes app can store your volunteer, work, and other experience for your application. Google Calendar, Outlook, and your online calendar can alert you with reminders for your working time blocks. Use technology to help you do your best work and keep on your assigned timelines.

 

Keep calm and carry on

Applying for college takes time and energy. Remember that you can do this well. It is worth the time and attention to organization that will help you throughout this process.

 

Need help in the college application process? I am here to help!