Year End Review

year end review

 

The end of the year is time for reflection. Its a time to think about successes.  Your year end review encompasses all the good things that happened this year.

My top 25

Each year I make a list of my top successes.  These include time spent with my family, professional successes, and personal successes. Here are some of my list this year:

  • Week with grandkids
  • Travel to with family
  • Service to NAPO Award
  • Chair of NAPO committee

I encourage you to write your list and share it with someone who can appreciate your successes.

 

My peeps

It’s about the people. It’s the new and existing relationships that make the year the best ever. Who are the people who helped me be the best I can be? As I move forward next year my goal is to surround myself with people who sharpen my authenticity and make me think hard and work hard.  Relationships are what make the year outstanding. I like to make a list of these people and send them a thank you note sharing my gratitude.

 

What’s working for me

Take stock of what’s working in your life and why.  It’s the best way to build success.  When something works, there are elements that can transfer to work and home that will improve your year.  Take time this last week of the year to make a list for yourself and keep it where you can refer back to it and add to it all year.

 

year end review

 

Your Year End Review prepares you for setting goals and making dreams happen in the coming year. Take time to take stock before you start fresh for the new year.

 

 

Top Down Planner

 

top down planner

 

As you might guess, I am a big fan of planners! Your planner is a tool to help you process and plan.  We all have our favorites.  Here’s one I’d like to introduce you to that I have recently found.

 

Top Down Planner  was created to help you achieve your goals by writing them down.  The planner includes 12 monthly and 52 weekly sheets for you to write in your tasks. Each page includes a space to declare your goals so you keep on track to align your tasks with your goals. No more off track activities that bog you down or get you side tracked.

 

The emphasis on goals makes this planner different.  More than just recording what needs to be accomplished, your goals are in front of you daily.  Having your goals, tasks, and appointments all on one page make for more focused and productivity.  The Top Down planner helps you start at the top of your priorities and work down to ensure your success.

 

Interested in this planner?   You can buy  it  at  Top Down Planner

OR you can post a comment below about why using a planner makes a difference in your work and at home.

Winner will be chosen by random drawing.  Hope you win!

 

 

Teaching your Teen Time Management

teen time management

 

 

Your kids have known how to tell time since elementary school.  But as teens they are late, don’t get chores complete or other things done on time, and they may even turn in papers late to school.  Time management is more than just knowing how to read a clock.  It’s a struggle for teens to know what to do and how to get things done with time management.

 

According to Psychology Today, time management is just one of the four most critical areas for teens today.  With the level of brain development, teens are not fully equipped for time management.  Because brain development continues into our twenties, teens benefit from our coaching them with time management through high school and college.  Teens are unsure of what to do first, how long it will take to complete and how to get started.  Teen time management includes coaching in prioritizing, duration, and initiation/procrastination.

 

Prioritizing

What’s important and should be done first? That’s a question not only teens struggle with.  Parents don’t always agree on this between themselves.  How do we know what’s most important? It can be a matter of focus for all of us.  However,  you can help your child make these decisions by helping them process what needs to be done.

  • Model your priorities and talk about them with your kids.
  • Encourage your teen to write down their priorities or create a vision board to see their priorities.
  • Grid out with your kids the time available and where their priorities fit on the grid.
  • Take time to plan. Have plan A, B and Z.  It’s important to set tasks into motion, but not be rigid.

 

 

Duration

We don’t know how long it takes to get a specific task done. But we do know that we can guess and set a time on our calendar to get a task done.

  • Help your teen create routines that take just 5 minutes. Make their bed, place laundry in the basket and put trash away are 3 small tasks that take less than 5 minutes all together.
  • Create more time awareness with more analog clocks.  Clocks should be in all your spaces to be sure you are gauging your time.
  • Use the 3 minute rule. If it takes less than 3 minutes, just do it.
  • Break big projects or tasks into baby steps.  Map out small sections of a project, assign a time and date to accomplish them.  Nothing seems as overwhelming when it’s broken into smaller chunks.

 

 

Initiation and Procrastination

  • Make it fun to get started.  Find an innovative way to start a project.  You can add in technology or a gadget, work with a partner, or create a new perspective on the project.
  • Schedule the time to start a project. At that time, use a timer, set for 15 minutes, to help you get started.
  • Brain storm the costs of procrastination. What’s at stake? What’s will happen? Is there is compelling reason to do this?
  • Set up a compelling, organized environment.  A clear work space, quiet or white noise, and easy to access school supplies makes it easier to get started.

 

Tools for time management

Planners

 

Focusing apps

 

On your smartphone

  • Clock with timer for getting started and timing how long a task takes
  • Pandora play list for organizing or homework
  • Notes for making lists
  • Reminders and more tech

 

It takes practice, practice, and practice to learn the skills of time management. Don’t get impatient with  your teen on how long it takes.  Every experience is a learning opportunity here.

 

 

 

Teaching Your Kids Time Management

kids time management kids

 

Telling time is part of our school curriculum in second grade.  Our kids learn about analog clocks, what time it is and how to tell time. They see digital clocks everywhere in our homes. Telling time is just the first part of time management.  More than just telling time, time management is about prioritizing what to do when, how long a task takes, and breaking a task into smaller steps for completion.   Teaching your kids time management skills takes time, practice and patience.

 

Time management basics

Time management is about prioritizing, duration, and chunking.

  • We prioritize what tasks need to be done when we have a date or deadline.  How do we know what’s important when there is neither of these?  Tasks become a priority when we have a clear value for ourselves personally.  We have parents shaped those values with our family.
  • We know the duration of a task, or how long it takes, from experiences we have.  Each of us can do the same task but have it take different amounts of time depending on many parts.  Allowing ourselves extra time to complete a task makes it easier.
  • Chunking is breaking a task into manageable chunks.  We can’t always complete a task in a certain amount of time, but if we break it into smaller bits we can be assured of completion.

 

Time Management for elementary age kids

As parents are a “talking the talk and walking the walk” of our priorities for our kids.  In elementary school most kids have a variety of academics and extracurricular activities.  We have set up extracurricular activities for our kids to have varied experiences.  Our priorities for their experiences shape their activities.

  • If your family values wellness, choose one activity that includes exercise such as baseball, dance or gymnastics for each child.
  • If your family values spirituality, attend weekly at church or synagogue or bible study.
  • If your family values academic success, establish a daily homework time starting at an early hour.

Keep mindful of how many priorities your family has.  Weigh the value of over committing to an abundance of extracurricular activities.  All activities are good, but which is best for your family.  Your kids can be over scheduled in elementary school and feel stressed by being rushed between activities.

 

Help your kids learn how long a task takes by establishing time for them to work on a chore or a project.  We often are unaware or unsure of how long it takes to unload the dishwasher, look up information on a computer or complete a worksheet as homework.

  • Keep a time log and see how long an activity takes.
  • Set a timer and see how long an activity takes.
  • Use a time timer and see how long an activity takes.

 

Breaking tasks into management pieces takes practice too.  It could be a school related project or organizing your space, but every project can be broken down into smaller units to complete.

  • Use the pomodoro method with a timer, segmenting your work into 20 minutes time slots.
  • Use a mind map and map out a plan for each step of a project.
  • Make a list of the steps in a project.

 

Each of these tools helps you model time management and engage with them in the process. We always need improved processes ourselves.  Teaching our kids will make us use these tools more effectively too.

 

Check out more on time management here.

 

Time is on my side, yes it is!

Your Most Organized Year Ever

Your Most Organized Year Ever

 

Each year as we start the new year, we think of ways to make a change and improve our lives.  Did you know that organizing is one of the top three goals each year?  Throughout the month of January, I will be offering 31 tips to help you have Your Most Organized Year Ever.  Implement just one of these tips, tools, techniques or tweaks this year. 

 

Notice where there are clocks in your home and office?

 

Are these digital or analog clocks?

Adding more clocks in your home and office will help manage  your time more effectively.

 

An analog clock helps you judge that time is passing. It’s a visual tool that helps us assess.  It can also help remind us of what step in a process we want to be at in order to get to the finish line.  Having a clock in a bathroom helps us get out the door on time. Having a wall clock hanging in your office helps you finish your work to be home on time.  Make this Your Most Organized Year Ever by adding more analog clocks in your home and office.

 

More ideas on time management on my Time is On My Side pinterest board.

 

Your Most Organized Year Ever

Your Most Organized Year Ever

Each year as we start the new year, we think of ways to make a change and improve our lives.  Did you know that organizing is one of the top three goals each year?  Throughout the month of January, I will be offering 31 tips to help you have Your Most Organized Year Ever.  Implement just one of these tips, tools, techniques or tweaks this year. 

 

What is written in your planner?

 

 

Is your planner full to the brim or barely completed?

 

 

Did you know you can use your for more than just recording meetings?

 

 

Your planner is a great tool to help you process and plan.

  •  Use your planner to record deadlines for important projects.  Decide what parts of the project you want to accomplish by certain dates, breaking the project into smaller pieces. These mini-deadlines help you complete the project on time.
  • If your project requires input from colleagues, write in dates you will request information and get it back.  Give your colleagues and yourself ample time to complete the project.
  • Write in tasks you want to work on during a specific time on a certain date.
  • Record deadlines for requests from your boss.
  • Record expense account deadlines and write in time to complete the reports.

Make this Your Most Organized Year Ever with using your planner to plan.

 

Not sure what planner is best for you?

 

Check out this free weekly printable too.

 

 

Your Most Organized Year Ever

Your Most Organized Year Yet

Each year as we start the new year, we think of ways to make a change and improve our lives.  Did you know that organizing is one of the top three goals each year?  Throughout the month of January, I will be offering 31 tips to help you have Your Most Organized Year Ever.  Implement just one of these tips, tools, techniques or tweaks this year. 

 

Take time each week to review the upcoming week.  Look through the existing appointments and add what has not been noted on your calendar.

 

With your list and calendar, consolidate what is a priority and when you will do it.

 

Weekly planning time gives your the opportunity for a week in review. It’s a time to take a bird’s eye view of what you have coming up and be sure you stay on track. It’s a way to be sure everything is accounted for in the week ahead.  Yes, your plan may change mid week. However with a weekly plan you know that priorities will be taken care of.

 

To be sure weekly planning time is accomplished set a consistent time to do this.  It could be Friday afternoon toward the end of the work day or Sunday afternoon at the start of the week.   Give yourself 30- 60 minutes to be sure you fully complete your planning.  Stay on track by writing your weekly planning time in your planner just like other meetings you are attending.  Make this Your Most Organized Year Ever with your weekly planning time.

 

 

More ideas on time management here!

 

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Your Most Organized Year Ever

Most Organized Year Ever

Each year as we start the new year, we think of ways to make a change and improve our lives.  Did you know that organizing is one of the top three goals each year?  Throughout the month of January, I will be offering 31 tips to help you have Your Most Organized Year Ever.  Implement just one of these tips, tools, techniques or tweaks this year. 

Families have a lot going on! There are dates for school, dates for church and dates for volunteering.  It’s too much to keep in our heads.  How do we track all this information?

 

Your family calendar creates communication, coordination and cohesiveness.    It’s one place you see all the information together.  Your family works as a team to be sure you are arriving on time as well as prioritizing which activities you are attending.  It gives everyone a starting point to communicate about priorities.

 

Is it wise to keep two calendars, your own and your family calendar?  Coordination is required.  For the parents, it’s important to have all the dates in one place. For the kids, it’s important for them to track and see their own responsibilities.  This redundancy can help remind everyone about upcoming activities and be sure your schedule runs smoothly.  Make this Your Most Organized Year Ever with your family calendar.

 

More ideas on family communication stations here!

 

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Your Most Organized Year Ever

Your Most Organized Year Ever

 

 

Each year as we start the new year, we think of ways to make a change and improve our lives.  Did you know that organizing is one of the top three goals each year?  Throughout the month of January, I will be offering 31 tips to help you have Your Most Organized Year Ever.  Implement just one of these tips, tools, techniques or tweaks this year. 

So many papers! So many dates! So much to coordinate!

 

Your family meeting is the key to cooperation, communication and organization.  Each week host your meeting to share what’s coming up this week, gather information on what’s needed and coordinate schedules.  Everyone should bring their own planner to fill in.  There should be a family calendar to complete too. Display that in the kitchen where everyone sees it.  Your family calendar can be a google calendar printed out or a big month at a glance paper calendar.  It’s in seeing your monthly events that everyone stays on track.

 

There are three tricks to success for your meeting. Set your meeting at a time that is good for your family.  Keep it short so everyone stays on track.  End it with fun activity. That can include making ice cream sundaes, going on a bike ride, or watching a family movie.  Make this Your Most Organized Year Ever with your family meeting.

 

Check out more family manager ideas here on Pinterest.

 

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5 Tips and Tricks for Time Management

 

time management

 

Are you at a loss at the end of a busy day and feel like you have accomplished nothing? Feel distracted by interruptions including co-workers and email?   Whether you work at home or work outside the  home, it’s time to be proactive about your time.  It’s the distractions and interruptions that take away a lot of our time, as well as the last minute requirements from those around us.  Here are 5 tips and tricks for time management to get you started on difficult tasks and project.

 

Time assessment

It can be hard to know how long a project will take.  Mapping out a plan can help.   Write out each step and the amount of time it will take to complete.  Assign completion dates, including the final completion date.  Get started on your project by breaking this into manageable pieces on your calendar.  Start early to give yourself a buffer.

Time blocking

Setting a specific time can help you start or complete a project. Just like an appointment with a doctor,  setting an appointment with yourself helps you work on a specific task.  Block out the time and keep it sacred to use for a task that requires lots of brain power.  Start with the first time slot of the day so you can be sure nothing interrupts you too.

Day of the Week

Our jobs require so many different activities and focus.  Set a day of the week to do a certain task or project all day.  It might be Money Monday or Financial Friday.  By having a priority for the day, you can put aside other details and distractions.  Or leave Monday or Friday open just to close the loops and projects.

Timers

A time timer or kitchen timer can help you start or finish a task.  Set it for 15 minutes and just do it.  Set the timer three times like this and you have worked 45 minutes total.  If you need more time,  start this process again the next day.

Power periods

My favorite tip for starting and completing projects is a power period. It is a one hour slot of uninterrupted time to work on difficult and thoughtful projects. It works for me because in an hour I feel I have accomplished a great deal. Then I can give any project time to percolate and some back refreshed with a new perspective on the work.  I use as many power periods as I need to reach completion.  I start very early on projects so I have time to add at the end, just in case.

What tips and tricks do you use for  productivity and time management?

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